Albuquerque Folk Festival Logo

Laurie Lewis
and
Tom Rozum

Sandia Stage: 3:00 PM

Sandia Stage: 8:00 PM

International Bluegrass Music Association executive director Dan Hays calls Laurie "one of the preeminent bluegrass and Americana artists of our time." Acclaimed musician Sam Bush puts it more simply, calling her "a great singer, terrific fiddle player, fine songwriter, and one very good band leader." Laurie also performed on both the Grammy-award winning, 1997 IBMA album of the year "True Life Blues: The Songs of Bill Monroe," and the Grammy-nominated Ralph Stanley & Friends' release "Clinch Mountain Country."

New England native Tom Rozum "possesses an earnest tenor voice in the vein of contemporary bluegrass great Tim O'Brien, and peels off rhythmically crisp licks on mandolin and guitar." -Derk Richardson In 1998, he released his debut solo album "Jubilee" on Dog Boy Records. "Without reservation, one of 1998's most rewarding acoustic releases." -Amazon.com

In 2004, Lewis & Rozum released their third duo album, "Guest House" (their first for HighTone Records), a characteristically versatile and engaging offering of love songs, laments, social commentary, and freewheelin' fun in the spirit of old-time music. Laurie and Tom pay homage to such eminent influences as Woody Guthrie, Hazel Dickens, Grandpa Jones, and the inimitable Bill Monroe, adding their own distinctive touches to traditional favorites as well as performing several of Laurie's nonpareil compositions.

International Bluegrass Music Association executive director Dan Hays calls Laurie "one of the preeminent bluegrass and Americana artists of our time." Acclaimed musician Sam Bush puts it more simply, calling her "a great singer, terrific fiddle player, fine songwriter, and one very good band leader." Laurie also performed on both the Grammy-award winning, 1997 IBMA album of the year True Life Blues: The Songs of Bill Monroe, and the Grammy-nominated Ralph Stanley & Friends' release Clinch Mountain Country.

New England native Tom Rozum "possesses an earnest tenor voice in the vein of contemporary bluegrass great Tim O'Brien, and peels off rhythmically crisp licks on mandolin and guitar." -Derk Richardson In 1998, he released his debut solo album Jubilee on Dog Boy Records. "Without reservation, one of 1998's most rewarding acoustic releases." -Amazon.com

In 2004, Lewis & Rozum released their third duo album, Guest House (their first for HighTone Records), a characteristically versatile and engaging offering of love songs, laments, social commentary, and freewheelin' fun in the spirit of old-time music. Laurie and Tom pay homage to such eminent influences as Woody Guthrie, Hazel Dickens, Grandpa Jones, and the inimitable Bill Monroe, adding their own distinctive touches to traditional favorites as well as performing several of Laurie's nonpareil compositions.

For more info: www.laurielewis.com

Growling Old Men

Jemez Stage: 12:30 PM

Sandia Stage: 6:00 PM

Ben Winship (mandolin & vocals) and John Lowell (guitar & vocals) are both veterans of the Northern Rockies' acoustic music world and have been performing and recording together since 1998. Together the duo presents a tight, yet relaxed set of original and traditional bluegrass songs, ballads and tunes – informed equally by the music of the Appalachian hills and the western plains.

Ben Winship is a multi-instrumentalist and was a founding member of Loose Ties, with whom he performed from 1986 to 1996. In the words of Tim O'Brien, "Ben is one of the acoustic music scene's best writers." In addition to the Growling Old Men, he also performs with Brother Mule, the Fishing Music Band and a local Dixieland band. Ben also runs a well respected recording studio, the Henhouse, and his CDs and soundtracks have appeared in numerous documentaries and everywhere from MTV, ESPN, NPR, Sirius to the World Café and Car Talk – a testament to Winship's versatility and broad appeal. Despite countless hours driving around with windows down and running a chainsaw, Ben's hearing is still pretty good.

John Lowell has been a stalwart of the Montana bluegrass scene for the past 25 years. Fronting two of the regions finest bluegrass bands, Wheel Hoss and Kane's River, John has set a standard for rock solid guitar playing and great singing. "John Lowell is an engaging vocalist and a facile guitarist," said Bluegrass Unlimited, adding that, "he is a great storyteller." Lowell's songs often show up on the bluegrass radio charts, having been covered by a growing list of contemporary bands: Valerie Smith, Front Range, New Vintage, Bryan Bowers, Bluegrass Etc. John has been featured on the cover of Flatpicking Guitar Magazine, he has been compared to some of the finest guitarists in the business, and to a ham sandwich.

Here's what some other folks have said about them:

"I've been hearing about these young men for a long time but they do not come around American centers of population to advance their careers. They have isolated themselves out here in Montana and Victor, Idaho on account of their lifelong obsession with fishing. Not so old, not so growly, a real fine bluegrass duo. They're great." - Garrison Keillor of A Prairie Home Companion

"The duo makes uncompromising music that fits somewhere between Old & In The Way, and Chris Hillman. The playing is fluid and inventive, the vocals tight, and the arrangements fresh. The duo doesn't set a foot wrong in this unpretentious set." - Relix Magazine

For more info: www.growlingoldmen.com

The Mike + Ruthy Band

Sandia Stage: 7:00 PM

Americana stand-outs Mike + Ruthy have assembled a new band and, as was the case with their last one, The Mammals, fans and critics alike are showing a lot of love. Their debut album, "Bright as You Can," was released in June 2015 and top critics had this to say: "One of the year's standout Americana albums" (Boston Globe), "In the vanguard of today's vibrant folk revival" (PopMatters), "honoring the great musical traditions of the past while at the same time welcoming, with open arms, the future of what music can be" (Folk Alley), and much, much more.

He's a songwriting guitar-slinger with a knack for clawhammer banjo. She's a fiddler and uke-chanteuse who grew up in the American roots underground, the daughter of GRAMMY-winning fiddler, Jay Ungar. These two believe in the transformative power of a great live show. They write top-tier songs ("Some of the best songwriting of their generation" (LA Weekly), tour with their kids and peerless five-piece band (a sound they've taken to calling rural rock), and perform for audiences world-wide with a charm and on-stage ease that might make you think they're your new best friends. Of their own roots music festival the two founded in 2013, their late friend and mentor Pete Seeger wrote, "Dear Mike + Ruthy, Your Hoot was one of the best song-gatherings I've seen in all my 94 years. I hope next year I can be there for more than one day."

Woody Guthrie's guitar killed fascists. This family carries the torch.


"When it comes to chemistry, Mike Merenda and Ruth Ungar have plenty to spare. Onstage, they are Mike + Ruthy, a husband-and-wife duo setting the indie-folk scene ablaze. Singers and storytellers, poets and parents, the two tour with their children in tow, embodying a down-home approach to Americana. Bouncing between festivals and intimate venues, the troubadours bring harmony-driven fiddle and banjo tunes to more than 100 shows a year. Road-tested material such as the pair's celebrated recording of Woody Guthrie's "My New York City" cement Merenda and Ungar's status as a national treasure." - Seven Days, VT

"True Musicianship is alive and well." Performer Magazine

"An absolutely terrific gig that rattled by in a flurry of fun, flair, top musicianship and boundless energy." - Celtic Music Radio

"Folk, bluegrass, vintage country and just about everything else that falls under the catch-all heading of Americana." - Wall Street Journal

"From rollicking good times to more tender reflections, Bright As You Can is a winner." - NPR Music

For more info: mikeandruthy.com/

Bill Hearne Trio

Jemez Stage: 7:30 PM

Bill Hearne has been performing in the southwest for over 45 years, thirty three of those years with his wife, Bonnie Hearne. Bill and Bonnie have two nationally distributed albums, with Diamonds In The Rough, produced by noted Nashville producer, Jim Rooney, reaching #5 on Americana chart in 1998. Bill has continued on as Bonnie has retired with health considerations, doing songs by some of his dear friends and favorite singer/songwriters. Bill, with along with Don Richmond, (Rifters), has recorded three solo CD's, with the newest, Bill Hearne & Friends/All That's real, released in late 2014. It's tough to put Bill in one bag, but he calls his music a blend of Texas roadhouse, Americana, with a splash of Bluegrass. His influences include, Ian Tyson, Doc Watson, Buck Owens, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Lovett, Guy Clark, etc.

For more info: billhearne.com

ATC String Band

Welcome Tent: 10:30 AM

The ATC String Band is a student band from the Academy for Technology & Classics, a public charter school in Santa Fe. ATC offers a unique music class called "Acoustic Americana" in which students play and study folk music from all over America including old-time, bluegrass, blues, Cajun, and New Mexican. Students play fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, and bass. They sing in English, Spanish and French.

Albuquerque
Accordion Club

Welcome Tent: 9:30 AM

The club provides a regular forum where accordion players of all skill levels, beginners to advanced, have a place to play for and with like-minded other people in a supportive, non-competitive atmosphere.

For more info: www.albuquerqueaccordionclub.com

Antonia Apodaca

Sandia Stage: 11:00 AM

Antonia Apodaca (born November 1, 1923) is an American musician and songwriter known for her performances of traditional New Mexico music. She came to wider prominence through her performances in the La Música de los Viejitos and Nuestra Música festivals in Santa Fe, the festival's nationally circulated radio broadcasts, and her appearances at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

Apodaca was born in Rociada, a village in San Miguel County, New Mexico. Her parents, José Damacio Martinez and Rafaelita Suazo Martinez, were both musicians from families of musicians. Her mother played the accordion and guitar and her father the guitar, accordion, and violin. They had a small band which entertained at local dances and weddings. Antonia taught herself to play the accordion as a child, initially on a broken one she had rescued from the trash. Her mother and uncle continued teaching her, and by the time she was a young teenager she won an accordion contest in Santa Fe where she had competed against adults. She was also taught to play the guitar by father. At the age of 18, she met her future husband Macario "Max" Apodaca, a fiddler from Carmen (a village near Mora, New Mexico) who had asked to join her parents' band. They married two months later and in 1949 settled in Wyoming where Max got a job in the uranium mines. They were to live in Wyoming for the next 30 years and raise their five children there. Max played with a band of German musicians in Wyoming for several years, and he and Antonia continued to perform together for both the Hispanic and Anglo communities at dances and local events. Apodaca later recalled how she and her husband had learned how to adapt the traditional Hispanic polkas and waltzes to a Western rhythm when they played for the Anglos.

In 1979 the couple returned to Rociada to live in the house where Antonia was born and had grown up. Max Apodaca died in 1987 and Antonia ceased performing. A year later, the New Mexican folk violinist Cleofes Ortiz convinced her to return and she went on to perform extensively with Bayou Seco (the folk musicians Ken Keppeler and Jeanie McLerie) and later formed her own group, Trio Jalapeño. Trio Jalapeño is comprised of Antonia Apodaca on guitar and accordion, David Garcia on guitar, and Bernardo Jaramillo on the string bass. She has received numerous awards including the New Mexico Governor's Award for Excellence in the Arts in 1992, the same year she had appeared at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C.. In December 2010, her house in Rociada burned to the ground destroying what the National Hispanic Cultural Center termed "decades of musical history and treasured instruments." She escaped with only her guitar and two accordions.

After the fire, Apodaca moved to nearby Las Vegas and has continued to perform with Trio Jalapeño. Their concerts often include her own compositions, of which one of the best known is "Estas Lindas Flores" (These Beautiful Flowers). In 2011 she was awarded the Premio Hilos Culturales, an annual award presented to folk artists from New Mexico and Colorado "who have distinguished themselves in their communities as folk musicians or folk dancers of traditional southwest styles of Canciones Del Pasado or Bailes Antiguos."

Antonia will be accompanied by Linda Askew (guitar) and Scott Mathis (guitarron), and her son, Jose, for her performance at the 2016 ABQ Folk Festival.

Bayou Seco Duo

Unplugged Outlet: 1:30 PM

Ken Keppeler and Jeanie McLerie, who form the heart of Bayou Seco, have been researching and playing the music of the Southwest - from the Mississippi River to the deserts of Arizona - for thirty eight years. Respectfully drawing from these traditions and from their own ancestors, they present to the public an exciting and informative overview of Southwestern music on diatonic accordions, fiddles, guitar, mandolin, banjo and harmonica.

Jeanie McLerie has been a professional musician since 1962, performing in the U.S., Canada, and Europe with the groups: Sandy & Jeanie, The Harmony Sisters, and The Delta Sisters. During the past 30 years, she has been the head of a school of fiddle instruction for children called "The Fiddling Friends" which focuses on an international repertoire of fiddle styles and music, with an emphasis on the sources of the music, including personal contact with traditional musicians.

Being from a very musical family from New Mexico, Arizona and California, Ken Keppeler, a fourth generation Southwesterner, grew up with the music of the region, He has been a professional musician since 1972 and has performed all over North America and Europe. He is also a violin maker and, with his partner Peter White, has made over 150 instruments that are being played throughout the United States. As part of Bayou Seco's continuing effort to document traditional musicians in the Southwest, he completed a survey of cowboy music and dance for the Smithsonian Institute and has a degree from the University of New Mexico in American Studies.

Both Keppeler and McLerie have apprenticed (studied for two years or longer) with the following master musicians: Dennis McGee (perhaps the greatest Cajun fiddler); Canray Fontenot (Creole fiddler); Maurice Berzas & Alphonse "Bois Secâ" Ardoin (Cajun accordion players); Cleofes Ortiz (traditional New Mexican violinista); Antonia Apodaca (traditional New Mexican accordionist, guitarist and singer); Elliott Johnson (highly respected Tohono O'Odham) violinist; and Pete Lewis, cowboy fiddler.

They live in Silver City, New Mexico in an energy efficient home they built themselves, and they are very active in their local community with a volunteer operated radio station, KURU/GMCR and with teaching many people of all ages to play the fiddle.

For more info: www.bayouseco.com

Cactus Tractor

Sandia Stage: 9:00 PM

Cactus Tractor is a ten-person Bohemian Pop Folk Disco (beau-pop-faux-disc) band based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with three songwriters, toothsome harmonies, and a multitude of fun stringed and unstrung instruments. These include, but are not limited to, the hula horn (invented by Christy), the musical saw (which is dangerous), the violin (which is also dangerous if you're standing just to the left), the accordion (which is heavy), the charango (which attracts a lot of attention despite its small stature-much like its player, Stef!), buckets-and-buckets-full of harmonicas (which often fall on the ground and cause great consternation), frogs (which croak when struck with a stick-try it out!), and tea towels (which, laid artfully over a snare drum, make for a proper English quiet-funky kit sound).

We love playing farmers' markets, house shows, cafes, beer gardens, petting zoos, clothing swaps, nursing homes, and just about anyplace we will find teenagers uncomfortable to be with their parents. As of late, teens have reluctantly toe-tapped to our tunes at the New Mexico Southwest Regional Folk Alliance (showcased band), the Albuquerque Folk Festival*, the Tricklock Theater Company's Reptilian Lounge (house band), Road to Rich's Tie Dye Festival, the Albuquerque BioPark (botanic gardens and petting zoo), the Downtown Growers' Market, a Skarsgard Farms "Folk Circus," the Albuquerque Mennonite Church, the Regency Nursing Home in Springfield, IL (actually there were not that many teens there, but keep reading), the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice, and countless coffee shops, restaurants, and-for those peeking in the window-bars. Formed in 2012 to perform a concert of songs written by adult artists with developmental disabilities (co-written by Stef), Cactus Tractor is committed to fostering musical community in Albuquerque not only through performing but also through outreach and education. Our two best (and only) albums--"Cactus Tractor" and "Lydian Water Songs"--were funded by successful Kickstarter campaigns and are available on CD Baby, BandCamp, and iTunes.

We love playing farmers' markets, house shows, cafes, beer gardens, petting zoos, clothing swaps, nursing homes, and just about anyplace we will find teenagers uncomfortable to be with their parents. As of late, teens have reluctantly toe-tapped to our tunes at the New Mexico Southwest Regional Folk Alliance (showcased band), the Albuquerque Folk Festival*, the Tricklock Theater Company's Reptilian Lounge (house band), Road to Rich's Tie Dye Festival, the Albuquerque BioPark (botanic gardens and petting zoo), the Downtown Growers' Market, a Skarsgard Farms "Folk Circus," the Albuquerque Mennonite Church, the Regency Nursing Home in Springfield, IL (actually there were not that many teens there, but keep reading), the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice, and countless coffee shops, restaurants, and-for those peeking in the window-bars.

Formed in 2012 to perform a concert of songs written by adult artists with developmental disabilities (co-written by Stef), Cactus Tractor is committed to fostering musical community in Albuquerque not only through performing but also through outreach and education. Our first, only, and best album-Cactus Tractor-was funded by a successful Kickstarter Campaign and is available on CD Baby and iTunes.

*Not exactly true. The concert tent blew away in a wind storm and the festival was canceled before we had a chance to play.

For more info: cactustractor.com

Cali Shaw Band

Unplugged Outlet: 11:30 AM

A longtime fixture on the Albuquerque music scene, Cali Shaw has consistently pushed the folk music envelope beyond its traditional realms . Working with some of the most talented and diverse musicians in the Southwest, he's taken instruments not normally associated with the genre and made them seem perfectly at home and in proper context within the boundaries of his songs.

Whether performing solo or accompanied by a full band, Cali Shaw's dynamic and original performances captivates and embraces people of all generations. When accompanied with his regular backing band, the Cali Shaw Band deliver dynamic and original performances which captivates and embraces people of all generations.

Cali Shaw Band members include: Cali Shaw on guitars and vocals, Nick Baker on vibraphones and accordion, Dan Spanogle on upright bass, and Josh English on drums.

For more info: calishaw.com

Cheap Shots

Jemez Stage: 11:30 AM

Cheap Shots is an energetic seven-person acoustic band that draws upon an eclectic mix of old time, Celtic, contra dance, folk, country, old blues, bluegrass, swing, and klezmer. Intertwining instrumental and vocal music (including original songs), the band features hammer dulcimer, fiddle, guitar, mandolin, harmonica, banjo, bass, and the occasional bodhran (Irish drum). Cheap Shots won the Old Time Band contest at the 2006 Santa Fe Bluegrass Festival, and the group's singer/songwriter, Jimmy Abraham, who has two CDs to his credit, won the 2005 Songwriting Contest at the Walnut Valley Festival in Winfield, KS.

Cheap Shots has been together since 2004, with Jimmy Abraham since 2006, and with Gary Libman since 2015.

For more info: folkmads.org

Duke City Swampcoolers

Sandia Stage: 10:00 AM

The Duke City Swampcoolers are a bluegrass band from Albuquerque, New Mexico otherwise known as the "Duke City". It is called the "Duke City" because of its link to the Spanish Duke of Albuquerque. The band named itself after the trustworthy old evaporative air coolers that everyone uses in their homes in the dry desert southwest. Those things run day and night trying to cool the house down and they do have occasional breakdowns which seemed appropriate for a bluegrass band.

The band originally formed from an eclectic mix of professional people including a doctor, a pharmacist, a contractor/professor, a fellow who does something nuclear, and a retired newspaper editor from Massachusetts. They have been playing together for 13 years and officially formed in 2003.

Current members of the band include Anthony Smith (songwriter, lead vocal, harmony vocal, guitar), Bill DuFault (songwriter, lead vocal, harmony vocal, mandolin, guitar, spoons), Jon Bryan (songwriter, lead vocal, harmony vocal, banjo, ukulele, banjola, sound man), and Tony Kahn (bass). Grey Howell, an extraordinary Corrales musician, has been joining the band onstage to provide some truly inspired fiddle playing.

The band has three CD's out and they write many of the tunes that appear on their discs. "It Ain't the Years" and "Drained and Unplugged" both received accolades from New Mexico Magazine. "It Ain't the Years" contained eight original tunes and seven cover tunes from artists like Jerry Garcia, Duke Ellington, and Ralph Stanley among others. Their second CD, "Drained and Unplugged" was released at the end of 2008, contained fourteen all original band songs and also received an outstanding review from Bluegrass Unlimited Magazine. Finally, their third CD, released in 2012 and called "Cooler Heads Prevail", also had all original tunes and received a very fine review from Bluegrass Unlimited Magazine. Over the years, the band has played in many regional festivals and local venues. They have also played at large private events in Albuquerque and other locales

For more info: dukecityswampcoolers.com

JeeZ LaWeeZ

Sandia Stage: 12:00 PM

This fun and fabulous all-girl trio bends the rules of good taste with a batch of smart-alecky originals so tangy they'll make your mouth water. Follow that up with tasty interpretations from Elvis Costello to Leonard Cohen to David Bowie and Bach again. Luscious three-part harmonies and bodacious git-ups are their trademarks, served on a crispy bed of solid musicianship. You'll ask, "Did she really say what I think she said?" Yes, she did. This is post-menopausal folk-rock at its finest.

Katie Gill on guitar and ukulele, Amy Blackburn on violin, viola, and mandolin, Nancy Harvin on electric bass and percussion. Rockin' kazoo solos by request.

For more info: jeezlaweezmusic.com

Justin Evan Thompson

Sandia Stage: 4:00 PM

Justin Evan Thompson is a songwriter and performer from Albuquerque, New Mexico with an affinity for traditional folk music and the acoustic guitar. His persona and lyrics are as poetic as they are rough around the edges, and both lend themselves to honest and energetic performances.

With an instinctive knack for melody and prose, Justin's songs are as singable as they are poignant. Justin recently released his debut solo record, "Hymns for a Manchild," which was carefully crafted over the last year at Empty House Studios in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Recently, Justin has been performing with Gregg Daigle (banjo, madolin, guitar), Jon Mcmillan (bass), and Paul Hunton (lead guitar). These very talented musicians are heavily featured on "Hymns for a Manchild" and bring the record to life on stage.

For more info: justinthompsonmusic.com

Kevin Herig

Jemez Stage: 2:30 PM

Kevin's music is a mix of laid back folk/rock that often incorporates electric guitar and looping. With a smooth infectious style, he is easily liked both on and off the stage.

Kevin has been deeply rooted in the Albuquerque music scene since his debut in 2006 with his first band, Asper Kourt. With Kevin as the front man, the band was chosen by and featured on MTVMusic.com as their "The Needle in the Haystack," and was featured on The Food Network's, "What Would Brian Boitano Make?" Kevin released his debut solo album, "Give It All Away," in early 2014 and is set to release a new EP in March 2016.

For more info: www.kevinherig.com

Lone Piñon

Jemez Stage: 9:30 PM

Lone Piñon is an acoustic trio from Santa Fe, New Mexico that plays the ensemble-driven violin music of Mexico's Huasteca and Tierra Caliente regions, and traditional music from the area known as El Rio Grande del Norte: Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado.

The band features three musicians whose careers have woven through a wide spectrum of roots music before converging in 2012 in Northern New Mexican Music.

Greg Glassman (guitar, vocals) first engaged his musical education as a clawhammer banjo player with the Gnawa musicians of Essouira, Morroco. Upon returning to North America, he began drumming for experimental jazz and Irish punk outfits, and performing as a rockabilly and gospel singer before travelling to southern Veracruz, Mexico to study Son Jarocho.

Jordan Wax (fiddle, vocals) grew up in Missouri and was traditionally trained by master Ozark fiddler Fred Stoneking and later apprenticed with Central Missouri dance fiddler John White. He worked as bandleader and accordionist for a klezmer-punk brassband, helped launch Latin-ska project La Rocola Bacalao in Quito, Ecuador, and has played music in the context of rural life in Kichwa-speaking communities of Ecuador and in the Missouri Ozarks.

Noah Martinez (guitarrón) grew up in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque immersed in the music of his community: rock, orquesta tejana, Onda Latina, norteño, honky-tonk, Western swing, and the recently arrived jaranero movement that started in southern Veracruz. His skills on upright and electric bass have made him nearly ubiquitous in the Northern New Mexican music scene. The trio has dedicated years to learning and performing the acoustic ensemble tradition that is at the heart of the region's musical landscape, working to reinfuse the repertoire with the vitality it lost with the passing of its most prominent musicians in the last few decades. On stage, Lone Piñon clusters around a single microphone and digs into their repertoire with explosive abandon. Strings are pummeled by the complex strumming rhythms of huapango, horsehairs fly from violin pyrotechnics, and the audience is propelled forward by the guitarrón-driven pulse of New Mexican polkas and inditas. Soaring harmony vocals in Spanish, English, and Nahuatl give voice to a musical landscape of the Río Grande del Norte that like its desert surroundings is powerful, diverse, and undeniably alive.

Though New Mexican fiddle music thrived in isolated farming valleys of the high desert, the tradition represents a forging of diverse cultures that came together in the region. As part of a young generation of traditional musicians at home in a global, connected world, Lone Piñon has reestablished musical connections to the styles that have historically been the wellsprings of the New Mexican sound: regional son from Mexico, Indigenous violin music of the Southwest and Mexico, Anglo-American fiddling from the Midwest, traditional Spanish music, and Western Swing from Texas and Oklahoma. The result is a new birth for an old sound--a sound that is rooted in place and tradition but fully awake to the modern musicianship that the members of the trio bring it.

In early 2015 the band's development inspired fiddler Jordan Wax to travel to Mexico's Huasteca, a region historically connected musically to Santa Fe by the Camino Real, for a 6-month immersion in indigenous ceremonial and Huapango dance music. Since the band has been back together they have been playing extensively in Northern New Mexico and were asked to represent the region at the ¡Globalquerque! Festival of World Music and Culture.

For more info: www.lonepinon.com

Mala Maña

Jemez Stage: 1:30 PM

Mala Maña, New Mexico's own women's voice and drum ensemble, draws its inspiration from the rhythms of Afro-Colombia's Atlantic and Pacific coasts, but does not stop there: woven into the mix are Caribbean reggaeton, African-American traditional, Salsa, Mexican cumbia, and their own cumbia-inspired original compositions. Like a collective, Mala Maña consists of eight women who share diverse backgrounds in African and Latin pop, flamenco dance, and Mexican norteño music. Their love for the rhythm-inspired music of Colombia's coastal people brought this vision of diversely-talented women together to offer a unique and exciting tapestry of many voices and many drums. Mala Maña's members are: Chava (Chava and Paid My Dues Blues Band, Chava and SoMA, Guajira), Alyson Steinman (Wagogo, Chava and Paid My Dues Blues Band), Lydia Garcia (Concepto Tambor), Maria Teresa Guevara (L@s Otr@s) Lupe Mendoza, Nola Bartlit, Stephanie Sample, Yali Barraza, Caro Acuña

For more info: www.malamanamusic.com

Maria y Yahví

Jemez Stage: 3:30 PM

Maria y Yahví joyfully share music from various Mexican music traditions including music from the U.S./Mexico border, Son Jarocho (Veracruz), and Son Calentano (Michoacan/Guerrero). They are both multi-instrumentalists and vocalists and taught at the world renowned Old Town School of Folk Music before moving to Las Cruces. They have just started a new center called Carambola Community Music in El Paso where they get to share their love of music by teaching to both children and adults. These players have deep roots and connections to the music and instruments they will be sharing with you. They have traveled to Mexico for the past ten years studying with master musicians. Their instrumentation includes fiddle, guitar, jarana, voice, percussion and marimbol.

For more info: mariayahvi.com

Meredith Wilder

Sandia Stage: 1:00 PM

Meredith Wilder is an Albuquerque singer/songwriter. She started writing and performing ten years ago and has since released two full-length solo albums as well as two full-length albums with her band Wildewood. Along with recording, touring, and writing she teaches private music lessons and children's choir. A fellow songwriter and friend has dubbed Wilder the "Songbird of the Sandias."

For more info: meredithwilder.me

New Mexico
Special Orchestra

Unplugged Outlet: 2:30 PM

Special Orchestra®, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose purpose is to help persons with developmental disabilities share in the joy of making music. Using similarly tuned instruments (key of C), special orchestras can start playing right away! The New Mexico Special Orchestra, the pioneer ensemble of Special Orchestra, Inc., has been helping people with special needs make music since 1999. At SpecialOrchestra.org we share adaptive music techniques developed here in New Mexico, globally.

For more info: specialorchestra.org

Red Light Ramblers

Unplugged Outlet: 4:30 PM

Red Light Ramblers makes you want to kick up your heels with a lively organic blend of Cajun, Southern old-time, Irish bluegrass and folk-esque tunes all while singing in three-part harmony. The musicians are Barb Belknap (mandolin, melodeon), Mike Hill (fiddle, guitar), and Marc Robert (banjo, guitar). Always ready to have a good time, they welcome the opportunity to play and share the joy of foot-stomping, down-home music. They'll send you home with a lift in your step.

Red Light Ramblers' musicianship and delightful three-part harmonies have brought the Ramblers opportunities to play at numerous Albuquerque venues such as O'Niell's Pub, The Range Café, Shade Tree Customs Cafe, Anasazi Fields Winery; for nonprofit groups such as the Wild Earth Guardians, Vista de Oro Wildlife Refuge, Corrales Arts in the Park; and for larger events including the Albuquerque Folk Festival, the Southwest Chocolate and Coffee Fest, the Southwest Bacon Festival, and others.

We've played the ABQ Folk Festival stage a couple years ago and have volunteered in the Jam With A Band performances.

For more info: redlightramblers.com

Round Mountain

Jemez Stage: 4:30 PM

Blending dusty American grit with a worldly amalgam of global influences, Santa Fe-based duo Round Mountain presents a singular take on folk music that is both foreign and familiar. The multi-multi-instrumentalist band of brothers has travelled the globe absorbing bits and pieces of musical cultures, returning to filter them through their own sepia-toned Americana framework.

Char and Robby Rothschild have been crafting a sound that spans alt-folk and world genres since 2002. After years of immersion in global music, they began their work together, combining instruments and skills learned there with songs of longing and belonging, of nature, family and home. They strive to bring listeners to a place of musical grounding and connection. Their Round Mountain is a promontory from which the world's interconnected beauty can be felt, where melodic and rhythmic paths traveled by Appalachian, Celtic, West African, Balkan and Middle-Eastern music arrive at a common summit.

"The Goat" is Round Mountain's fourth release and follows their 2009 full-length "Windward," 2007's "Truth and Darkness," and 2004's self-titled debut. On these albums and on stage, Char sings and plays accordion, guitar or dobro, together with trumpet or Bulgarian gaida, and highland bagpipes. Robby sings and plays percussion, the West African harp known as the kora, and the Irish bouzouki.

Round Mountain is a group with strong emotional and soulful footing, and an abundance of accomplishments over the years. In 2015 they performed to a full house in Santa Fe's Lensic Performing Arts Center, accompanied by their students from elementary to college age. They have opened for such folk icons as Toumani Diabate and Bela Fleck, David Lindley, A Hawk and a Hacksaw, Thomas Mapfumo, and the Indigo Girls, as well as opening for and recording with Andy Irvine. They've also performed with Toubab Krewe, Boulder Acoustic Society, Moira Smiley and VOCO, Taarka, Michael Cleveland, Frank Fairfield, Kailin Yong, the Steel Wheels, and Mark Growden. They've performed on notable stages across the country including the Freight and Salvage, Club Passim, The Living Room, Swallow Hill, Godfrey Daniels, Stone Soup, Santa Monica Broad Stage, the Chautauqua in Boulder, CO, Live Oak Music Festival, and the Claremont Folk Festival. Round Mountain has also contributed music to the films "Solace: Wisdom of the Dying" (2008) and "Ride the Divide" (2010).

For more info: roundmountainmusic.com

Rumelia

Downstairs Dance: 7:30 PM

Rumelia weaves an intricate and mesmerizing blend of contemporary and traditional folk elements in their sultry arrangements of Balkan, Roma, Turkish, Greek and Sephardic tunes. Rumelia is a group of women putting a new spin on music from eastern Europe, a region generally known as the Balkans. Founded in 2010 as a trio, Rumelia happily became a quartet in 2014 when Alysha Shaw permanently joined the group. Nicolle Jensen and Alysha Shaw provide a scintillating blend of close harmonies while Deborah Ungar and Sitara Schauer bring forth modern instrumentation in traditional tunes of the Balkan peninsula with finesse and style. A gamut of hand percussion round out the group's sound. You will be up and out of your seat for these four women of Rumelia!

Rumelia comes from the word "Rumeli" meaning "Land of the Romans," a Turkish word used to describe the Southern Balkan region. The music is unique to the western ear in that it uses odd time signatures (5/8, 7/8, 9/8, and 11/8), close harmonies, as well as eastern scales (maqamat) and tonalities. Rumelia's repertoire is derived from traditional and popular tunes of Albania, Turkey, Greece, Macedonia and Bulgaria, to name a few. A study of Balkan Sephardic music has been the focus of Rumelia's recent work.

For more info: rumeliamusic.com

Russell James Pyle

Unplugged Outlet: 6:30 PM

"Having cut his teeth releasing five albums with the Albuquerque, NM Americana band, The Porter Draw, Russell James Pyle now adds "solo artist" to his resume. His songs tell stories of American life and the struggle that people go through to survive in this epoch. Delivered with his trademark vibrato rasp, Russell "has his fingers placed firmly on the pulse of American life" (New Mexico Americana Music Society). Performances are are passionate and energetic, whether with his backup band or solo."

For more info: www.russelljamespyle.com

Ryanhood

Sandia Stage: 5:00 PM

Named 'Best Group/Duo' in the 2014 International Acoustic Music Awards (IAMA's), acoustic-duo Ryanhood got their first break more than a decade ago as street-performers at Boston's Quincy Market. It was there that they were spotted by a college booking agent and thrust into the college touring scene, where Campus Activities Magazine would name them "one of the most requested acts by college buyers all across the country." They've since gone on to perform more than 800 shows in 42 U.S. states over the past decade and have shared stages with Jason Mraz, Matt Nathanson, Train, American Authors, and have even been tweeted about by Ellen DeGeneres.

Cameron Hood's rich and folky lead vocals, Ryan Green's explosive guitar and mandolin riffs, and their airtight vocal harmonies prompted the Arizona Daily Star to call them, "a match made in radio heaven." Their fifth and newest album, "Start Somewhere," finds the band returning to the intimate storytelling and acoustic guitar interplay that was a hallmark of their early work as buskers. They currently reside in their hometown of Tucson, AZ, where they have won more than a dozen Tucson Music Awards including "Best Folk Band" and "Best Rock Band" (you can decide for yourself which is most accurate).

For more info: www.ryanhood.com

Silver String Band

Unplugged Outlet: 10:30 AM

We are a Bluegrass/String Band out of Albuquerque, New Mexico. We play a variety of traditionals, covers, and originals. Beginning as a trio, we have grown into a 5 piece where all members contribute songs, ideas, and their own voice to our music.

For more info: www.facebook.com

Singing Pilgrims

Jemez Stage: 10:30 AM

The Singing Pilgrims band members have been making music together for close to 20 years--beginning when Bria and Natasha were small children in The Apple Mountain Harp Kids ensemble directed by Jeanne. Their musical journey morphed through their growing up years and most recently, Jeanne and Natasha played with the band The Next Chapter, (New Mexico Talent Showcase Champions) with performance credits such as the World Bodhran Festival near Killarney, Ireland, the North Texas Irish Festival, the Longs Peak Scottish/Irish Highland Festival, and Silver Dollar City in Branson, Missouri, to name a few. Thousands of Albuquerque residents attended their hugely popular "Celtic Christmas Concert" series held annually for a decade. When The Next Chapter retired from performance after 10 years together, Natasha and Jeanne invited Bria, (Natasha's sister) to join them in continuing their musical journey. They recently traveled to Ireland, sharing their music all along the way and are planning a return trip there in 2016.

Jeanne Page is the matriarch of the group (affectionately called "Mama J" by her fellow band-mates) , and is a best-selling author of Hammered Dulcimer books with Mel Bay Publications. While the hammered dulcimer was Jeanne's main instrument in previous bands, in Singing Pilgrims, she focuses on her first love, the guitar.

Natasha Coffing is a multi-instrumentalist composing on the piano as well as the Celtic harp, but long ago, the fiddle became the instrument that felt most at home in her hands. Tasha's aggressive and passionate playing stye has become the centerpiece of the Singing Pilgrims' signature sound.

Gabrielle Coffing (Bria) rounds out the trio and it has been harder to nail her down to one primary instrument. She provides a strong rhythmic heartbeat on bodhran or dumbek for Tasha's sparkling jigs and reels but moves to the keyboards for most of the vocal numbers.

Soulful ballads in three part harmony fill out a Singing Pilgrims program and all three ladies take a turn on the Celtic harp--the instrument that brought them together and solidified their life-long friendship.

For more info: singingpilgrims.wordpress.com

The Adobe Brothers

Welcome Tent: 1:30 PM

The Adobe Brothers is an eclectic group of identical quadruplets that play a wide variety of acoustic music including bluegrass, Celtic, old-timey, Latin folk music and western swing - a composite style they refer to as "international bluegrass." Their tunes include compositions by members of the band, classics by some of the best-known acoustic musicians of this century, some of the most obscure tunes and songs written by folks nobody's ever heard of, and new music by emerging performers. They've been playing together for more than 30 years and have performed throughout New Mexico and the Southwest. The band has received awards for their performances and individual band members have won awards for their compositions and instrumental ability.

For more info: www.adobebrothers.com

The Green Billies

Sandia Stage: 2:00 PM

Born from late-night old-time music jams, The Green Billies bring the energetic "fiddle 'n' banjo" dance music of the East to the ears of New Mexico. When fiddle player Ezra Bussmann and banjoist Damon Toal-Rossi returned from the Portland Old Time Music Gathering in 2011 they wanted to experience the same energy in Albuquerque. Guitar player Matt Brooks had recently moved from North Carolina via Louisiana (and a few other stops) to Albuquerque and was ready to do the same. Dustin Orbesen kept sitting in on shows until we figured he was more of a Green Billie than a spectator. Sarah Ferrell stepped up with her booming bass (fiddle) and sweet vocals to round out our sound. So put on your dancin' boots, grab a partner and get ready for a good time!

For more info: greenbillies.com

The Mike + Ruthy Band

Sandia Stage: 7:00 PM

Americana stand-outs Mike + Ruthy have assembled a new band and, as was the case with their last one, The Mammals, fans and critics alike are showing a lot of love. Their debut album, "Bright as You Can," was released in June 2015 and top critics had this to say: "One of the year's standout Americana albums" (Boston Globe), "In the vanguard of today's vibrant folk revival" (PopMatters), "honoring the great musical traditions of the past while at the same time welcoming, with open arms, the future of what music can be" (Folk Alley), and much, much more.

He's a songwriting guitar-slinger with a knack for clawhammer banjo. She's a fiddler and uke-chanteuse who grew up in the American roots underground, the daughter of GRAMMY-winning fiddler, Jay Ungar. These two believe in the transformative power of a great live show. They write top-tier songs ("Some of the best songwriting of their generation" (LA Weekly), tour with their kids and peerless five-piece band (a sound they've taken to calling rural rock), and perform for audiences world-wide with a charm and on-stage ease that might make you think they're your new best friends. Of their own roots music festival the two founded in 2013, their late friend and mentor Pete Seeger wrote, "Dear Mike + Ruthy, Your Hoot was one of the best song-gatherings I've seen in all my 94 years. I hope next year I can be there for more than one day."

Woody Guthrie's guitar killed fascists. This family carries the torch.


"When it comes to chemistry, Mike Merenda and Ruth Ungar have plenty to spare. Onstage, they are Mike + Ruthy, a husband-and-wife duo setting the indie-folk scene ablaze. Singers and storytellers, poets and parents, the two tour with their children in tow, embodying a down-home approach to Americana. Bouncing between festivals and intimate venues, the troubadours bring harmony-driven fiddle and banjo tunes to more than 100 shows a year. Road-tested material such as the pair's celebrated recording of Woody Guthrie's "My New York City" cement Merenda and Ungar's status as a national treasure." - Seven Days, VT

"True Musicianship is alive and well." Performer Magazine

"An absolutely terrific gig that rattled by in a flurry of fun, flair, top musicianship and boundless energy." - Celtic Music Radio

"Folk, bluegrass, vintage country and just about everything else that falls under the catch-all heading of Americana." - Wall Street Journal

"From rollicking good times to more tender reflections, Bright As You Can is a winner." - NPR Music

The Noseeums

Unplugged Outlet: 5:30 PM

The Noseeums are a bluegrass/folk/gypsy jazz band out of Taos, New Mexico. We feature a variety of contemporary and some old time tunes.

For more info: www.facebook.com

The Rebbe's Orkestra

Unplugged Outlet: 12:30 PM

Incorporating the sounds and rhythms of Jewish music from many parts of the world, The Rebbe's Orkestra brings a unique style to Klezmer–the instrumental dance music rooted in the Jewish wedding ceremonies of Eastern Europe. The band's repertoire includes instrumental pieces from the Middle-East, and folk songs in several languages including Yiddish (a Germanic rooted language of East European Jews), Ladino (Judeo-Spanish), Hebrew, Russian, Arabic, Hungarian, Romanian, and Romany (the language of the Roma/ Gypsies). The band also plays some Israeli folk dance tunes, traditional fiddle tunes and songs from New Mexico, as well as traditional music from the Mediterranean and the Balkans. Recording and performing professionally throughout the southwest since 1996, The Rebbe's Orkestra has been exploring the ways in which Jewish musicians have interacted with surrounding musical traditions over the centuries. From Spain to Iraq, Poland to the Mediterranean: The Rebbe's Orkestra plays tunes and songs as widely divergent as the geography and yet with surprisingly similar themes.

The band released its first CD "Klezmer y mas" in 2010 to widespread acclaim. In addition to playing for hundreds (maybe thousands by now!!) of weddings and Bar Mitzvahs, the group has performed at Globalquerque (2006), The Outpost Performance Space-Outpost Productions (1997 & 2004), KlezmerQuerque 2003-2015, The Crestone Music Festival "Crestfest" 2011 (Crestone, Colorado), The Albuquerque Folk Festival (1998-2015), and at many other festivals and theaters throughout the southwest including the states of Texas & Arizona.

The Rebbe's Orkestra also gives fun and educational presentations which are perfect for schools, universities, senior centers and community centers. Band members give brief introductions to each song about its history, source(s), pertinence to Jewish culture and other cultures, its musical arrangement, as well as teaching simple lyrics and rhythms to sing and clap along. Adding to the participation level, the band can bring a dance leader to teach the simple line and circle dances that traditionally go with the music.

For more info: www.facebook.com

Virginia Creepers

Welcome Tent: 12:30 PM

The Virginia Creepers have been playing old-time music in New Mexico for 25 years. Past winners of the Old Time Band Contest at the Santa Fe Traditional and Bluegrass Music Festival, they play tunes and songs that range from the Civil War era and earlier to newer pieces in the old-time style.

The band features Rick Olcott on guitar, Scott Mathis on mandolin and guitarron, Laurie Phillips on mandolin and mandola, Jane Phillips on fiddle, and Marc Robert on bass and banjo. Based in Albuquerque, they play around NM and beyond for dances, parties, and festivals, and as soothing background music for the quiet and studious patrons of saloons and taverns.

For more info: www.virginiacreepers.com

Zoltan
and the
Fortune Tellers

Unplugged Outlet: 3:30 PM

Wild like the west, but fine like an aged whiskey
Zoltan and the Fortune Tellers are extremely frisky

Songs about women, and songs about cheese,
they will play a march fit for a circus of fleas

Songs about pecans, and songs about peeping toms
delusional dictators, and amorous love songs

With a rotating carousel of only the finest musicians
They are wildly hilarious, smart, and efficient

A jack of all trades, you will find Zoltan in movies
His musical antics are really a doozie

That is our story and we are sticking to it

For more info: www.zoltanszkly.wix.com